AAOS/ORS Translating Orthopaedic Technologies into Clinical Practice: Pathways from Novel Idea to Improvements in Standard of Care Research Symposium

Symposium Co-Chairs:  Michael Yaszemski, MD, PhD and Suzanne Maher, PhD

May 11-13, 2017 / Hyatt Rosemont / Rosemont, IL


  • Symposium Audience: Orthopaedic surgeons and researchers, Young Investigators, industry representatives, government representatives, and other medical specialties. Total registration is limited; early registration is encouraged.

  • Overview: Despite the wealth of innovation in the orthopaedic sciences, few technologies translate to clinical use. The symposium aims to educate surgeons and scientists about the multiple pathways toward commercialization in the orthopaedic field; create a forum for dissemination of commercialization initiatives specific to orthopaedics; and disseminate key components of successful commercialization strategy. The specific aims of the symposium are to: (i) educate surgeons and scientists about the multiple pathways toward commercialization in the orthopaedic field, (ii) create a forum for dissemination of commercialization initiatives specific to orthopaedics, and (iii) disseminate key components of successful commercialization strategy.

    The symposium will provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on best practices for commercialization as applied to the field of orthopaedics. Faculty will include surgeons who have experience balancing academic and corporate roles, scientists and entrepreneurs who have translated research into clinical care via start-up companies, industry representatives who have collaborated with surgeons, legal representatives who have protected ideas and structured contracts in the orthopaedic space, and funding sources. Through the multidisciplinary interaction of the diverse faculty, two commercialization pathways will be explored: The Industry-Clinician Relationship and Entrepreneurial Activities. Successful commercialization strategies and the types of teams and partnerships that can contribute to success will be highlighted, through discussion of the following topics:

    • Academic models for encouraging commercialization: an honest exchange of ideas about how seven large orthopaedic hospitals manage industry-clinician relationships and encourage entrepreneurial activities.
    • Idea protection: Mechanisms that are commonly used to protect ideas will be reviewed, and a comprehensive assessment of the process of securing a patent, and valuing the patent will be provided.
    • The Industry-Clinician Relationship: The challenges of creating robust agreements between parties, legal nuances and academic conflict of interest issues of industrial relationships for small and large hospitals and for contract vs. salaried surgeons will be reviewed.
    • Forming a Start-Up Company: The pathway to creating, running, and exiting a life-sciences startup company will be outlined, as an engineer, orthopaedic surgeons, and a CEO, review their successes in the orthopedic space
    • Funding your Company: This session will present an overview of the approaches that various funding sources such as early stage investors (angel investors), venture capitalists and federal agencies, like to take when considering applications.
    • Pitching your idea to Investors: Five pre-chosen young surgeons will each give a 10 minute pitch to a panel consisting of the speaker in the previous session. After questioning by a panel of investors, the audience will be asked to vote for the best presentation. 

  • Symposium Agenda



For more information on this research symposium, please contact Erin L. Ransford, AAOS Manager, Research Advocacy, at ransford@aaos.org.

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