JAAOS

JAAOS, Volume 21, No. 8


Cysts About the Knee: Evaluation and Management

Popliteal (Baker) cysts, meniscal cysts, proximal tibiofibular joint cysts, and cruciate ligament ganglion cysts are cystic masses commonly found about the knee. Popliteal cysts form when a bursa swells with synovial fluid, with or without a clear inciting etiology. Presentation ranges from asymptomatic to painful, limited knee motion. Management varies based on symptomatology and etiology. Meniscal cysts form within or adjacent to the menisci. These collections of synovial fluid are thought to develop from translocation of synovial cells or extravasation of synovial fluid into the meniscus through a tear. Joint-line pain and swelling are common symptoms. Management entails partial meniscectomy with cyst decompression or excision. Proximal tibiofibular joint cysts are rare, and their etiology remains unclear. Pain and swelling secondary to local tissue invasion is common, and management consists of surgical excision. Cruciate ligament ganglion cysts have no clear etiology but are associated with mucoid degeneration of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, knee trauma, and synovial translocation into these ligaments. Knee pain and limited range of motion, especially with exercise, are common presenting symptoms. In symptomatic cases, arthroscopic excision is commonly performed.

      • Subspecialty:
      • Sports Medicine

    Epinephrine in Local Anesthesia in Finger and Hand Surgery: The Case for Wide-awake Anesthesia

    Traditionally, surgeons were taught that local anesthesia containing epinephrine should not be injected into fingers. This idea has since been refuted in many basic and clinical scientific studies, and today, injection of lidocaine plus epinephrine is widely used for digital and hand anesthesia in Canada. The key advantages of the wide-awake technique include the creation of a bloodless field without the use of an arm tourniquet, which in turn reduces the need for conscious sedation. The use of local anesthesia permits active motion intraoperatively, which is particularly helpful in tenolysis, flexor tendon repairs, and setting the tension on tendon transfers. Additional benefits of wide-awake anesthesia include efficiencies and cost savings in outpatient surgical case flow due to the absence of conscious sedation.

        • Subspecialty:
        • Hand and Wrist

      Pelvic Fractures: Part 1. Evaluation, Classification, and Resuscitation

      Pelvic fractures range in severity from low-energy, generally benign lateral compression injuries to life-threatening, unstable fracture patterns. Initial management of severe pelvic fractures should follow Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols. Initial reduction of pelvic blood loss can be provided by binders, sheets, or some form of external fixation, which serve to reduce pelvic volume, stabilize clot formation, and reduce ongoing tissue damage. Persistently unstable patients may benefit from angiography with selective embolization, pelvic packing, or a combination of these interventions. Open pelvic fractures involving the perineum or bowel injury benefit from fecal diversion by colostomy. Trauma team coordination facilitates efficient resuscitative efforts and may affect definitive management by optimizing incision, ostomy, or catheter placement. Established protocols for both open and closed pelvic fractures help to standardize care.

          • Subspecialty:
          • Trauma

          • Adult Reconstruction

        Pelvic Fractures: Part 2. Contemporary Indications and Techniques for Definitive Surgical Management

        Once the patient with pelvic fracture is resuscitated and stabilized, definitive surgical management and anatomic restoration of the pelvic ring become the goal. Understanding injury pattern by stress examination with the patient under anesthesia helps elucidate the instability. Early fixation of the unstable pelvis is important for mobilization, pain control, and prevention of chronic instability or deformity. Current pelvic fracture management employs a substantial amount of percutaneous reduction and fixation, with less emphasis placed on pelvic reconstruction proceeding from posterior to anterior, and most reduction and fixation of unstable pelvic fractures done with the patient supine. Compared with control subjects with acetabular fracture or pelvic fracture alone, patients with combined injury have a significantly higher Injury Severity Score, lower systolic blood pressure, and higher mortality rates; they are also transfused more packed red blood cells. Even with anatomic restoration of the pelvis, long-term outcomes after severe pelvic trauma are below population norms. The most common chronic problems relate to sexual dysfunction and pain. Regardless of fracture type, neurologic injury is a universal harbinger of poor outcome.

            • Subspecialty:
            • Trauma

            • Adult Reconstruction

          Sarcoma Chemotherapy

          Sarcomas are a rare, heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of the bone or soft tissue. Although historically intended for the pharmaceutical treatment of microbes, today chemotherapy is used in orthopaedic oncology and is arguably the primary reason for improved survivorship. Agents such as anthracyclines (eg, doxorubicin), alkylating agents (eg, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide), antimetabolites (eg, methotrexate), topoisomerase inhibitors (eg, etoposide [VP-16]), vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine), and cytotoxic antibiotics (eg, actinomycin D) are used in various combinations to manage different types of tumors. Side effects are common and range from mild to severe. The effectiveness of the chemotherapy regimen correlates with the extent of tumor necrosis.

              • Subspecialty:
              • Basic Science

            Tendon Transfers for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

            Tendon transfer is one treatment option for patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. Although surgical indications are not clearly defined, the traditional thought is that the ideal candidate is young and lacks significant glenohumeral arthritis. The proposed benefits of tendon transfers are pain relief and potential increase in strength. The biomechanical rationale for the procedure is to restore the glenohumeral joint force couple and possibly to restore normal shoulder kinematics. The selection of donor tendon depends on the location of the rotator cuff deficiency. Transfers of latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major tendons have been shown to consistently improve pain; however, functional benefits are unpredictable. Trapezius tendon transfer may be an alternative in patients with massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tears, although longer-term follow-up is required.

                • Subspecialty:
                • Shoulder and Elbow

              Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures

              The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for treating distal radius fractures (DRF). Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The DRF AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany a DRF, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature. The 216 indications and 10 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, the Review Panel, a separate group of volunteer physicians, independently reviewed these materials to ensure that they were representative of patient scenarios that clinicians are likely to encounter in daily practice. Finally, the multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

                  • Subspecialty:
                  • Hand and Wrist

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