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Low-Grade Chondrosarcoma of the Scapula: Limb-Sparing Partial Resection and Reconstruction

January 01, 2012

Contributors: Brett Hayden, MD; Camilo E Villalobos, MD; Andrew M Silverman, BS; James C Wittig, MD; James C Wittig, MD

Peer review has expired on this program. It is the viewer’s responsibility to determine the educational value of this historical content.
Peer review has expired on this program. It is the viewer’s responsibility to determine the educational value of this historical content.

Our video describes a 57-year-old man who presented with an enlarging mass on his left shoulder girdle. The mass had been painful and growing for 5 years, but for several months his symptoms had gotten worse and the mass much larger. On the physical exam, the patient presented with very good range of shoulder motion, although there was deltoid atrophy. Radiologic studies demonstrated a large mass (20 x 17 x 10 cm) arising from his left scapula. There was a stalk that had a radiographic appearance consistent with a secondary chondrosarcoma. The cartilaginous cavity was very thick, up to 5 cm in some areas. A biopsy demonstrated cartilaginous neoplasm. The patient underwent a wide resection of the left scapula and multiple muscle rotation flaps for soft tissue reconstruction and closure of dead space, including rotation of the latissimus dorsi muscle, rhomboid muscle, serratus anterior muscle, trapezius muscle, deltoid muscle, and teres major muscle. All margins were free of neoplasm. Four years after resection, the patient is pain-free. He is doing well, playing golf, and doing all exercises without any difficulty.

Results for "Shoulder and Elbow"

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