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Arthroplasty for Chronic Locked Posterior Shoulder Dislocations

March 01, 2013

Contributors: Justin Ryan Brazeal, MD; Michael A Wirth, MD; Cezar Sandu, MD; Cezar Sandu, MD

Peer review has expired on this program. It is the viewer’s responsibility to determine the educational value of this historical content.
Peer review has expired on this program. It is the viewer’s responsibility to determine the educational value of this historical content.

BACKGROUND: Chronic locked posterior shoulder dislocations are uncommon injuries. Treatment is typically compromised by delay in diagnosis. Hemiarthroplasty is a viable treatment if less than 40% of the humeral head is involved and for dislocations under 6 months. MATERIALS & METHODS: A 29-year-old male with a history of a seizure disorder was referred to our institution for a chronic locked posterior glenohumeral dislocation. The diagnosis was established 8 weeks after the initial emergency room visit secondary to pain, loss of external rotation, and functional deficits noted during physical therapy. Surgical management included open reduction and hemiarthroplasty. Outcome was assessed by a modified American Shoulder and Elbow Score, a simple shoulder test, and visual analog scores. RESULTS: The patient had marked improvement in the modified American Shoulder and Elbow Score, simple shoulder test, and visual analog scores for all categories 2 years postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Hemiarthroplasty is a good option in the management of chronic locked posterior shoulder dislocation. Results are reliable with an overall decreased level of pain, improved range of motion, and improved level of function.

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