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Radical Resection of the Glenoid and Scapular Neck for Sarcoma and Reconstruction

December 01, 2012

Contributors: Brett Hayden, MD; Camilo E Villalobos, MD; James C Wittig, MD; Brendan J Comer, BA; Brendan J Comer, BA

Peer review has expired on this program. It is the viewer’s responsibility to determine the educational value of this historical content.
Peer review has expired on this program. It is the viewer’s responsibility to determine the educational value of this historical content.

The authors describe a 50-year-old female with a painful lesion in her left scapula. The pain grew progressively worse. During the physical exam, the patient presented with significant shoulder pain, restricted range of motion, and normal motor and sensation in her elbow, wrist, and digits. The radiographs demonstrated a mixed sclerotic-lytic lesion in the scapular neck with a particular area of lysis along the anterior-posterior glenoid. The patient underwent a biopsy, which demonstrated atypical spindle cell neoplasm. Treatment began with a radical resection of the left scapular neck including the lateral one half of the scapula and complex reconstruction of left shoulder girdle with static stabilization of the humeral head to the scapula and clavicle with heavy suture-tapes and multiple muscle rotation flaps for soft tissue reconstruction. A reconstruction of the rotator cuff and insertion of the brachial plexus catheter for postoperative analgesia was included. The final pathology was malignant peripheral nerve sheath. All margins were free of neoplasm. The patient is 10 months post resection and is pain free. She is doing well.

Results for "Total Shoulder Arthroplasty"

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