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Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty via a Direct Anterior Approach

March 01, 2019

Contributors: Zachary Berliner, MD; Nathaniel Mercer, BA, MS; Jose A Rodriguez, MD; Luke Gregory Menken, DO; Luke Gregory Menken, DO

Total hip arthroplasty is one of the most common and successful surgical procedures currently performed. As with all surgical procedures, complications may occur during total hip arthroplasty. Postoperative periprosthetic fracture is one of the major complications associated with total hip arthroplasty. As the number of total hip arthroplasty procedures performed continues to increase, a corresponding increase in periprosthetic fractures is projected. Risk factors for periprosthetic fracture include patient factors, such as age, sex, and osteoporosis, and surgeon factors, such as implant fixation, implant type, and surgical approach. Additional precautions must be taken in the patient population at risk of periprosthetic fracture. We use a direct anterior approach and a collared composite-beam stem with cemented fixation to decrease the risk of periprosthetic fracture in these patients. This video highlights key intraoperative techniques that allow for adequate femoral exposure and proper stem placement during cementing to achieve successful surgical outcomes.

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