We will be performing site maintenance on our learning platform at learn.aaos.org on Sunday, February 5th from 12 AM to 5 AM EST. We apologize for the inconvenience.

“The biggest advantage is that we can get more AAOS members involved, and they don’t have to travel so far. The biggest disadvantage thus far seems to be the time delay. You kind of feel like you’re on CNN and there’s a little 2- or 3-second delay between someone saying something and someone hearing it on the other end.” Craig J. Della Valle, MD; Chicago, Ill.

AAOS Now

Published 6/1/2009

Surgeon on the street

What do you like or dislike about AAOS satellite courses?

“The biggest advantage is that we can get more AAOS members involved, and they don’t have to travel so far. The biggest disadvantage thus far seems to be the time delay. You kind of feel like you’re on CNN and there’s a little 2- or 3-second delay between someone saying something and someone hearing it on the other end.” Craig J. Della Valle, MD; Chicago, Ill.
“I think it’s a really worthwhile innovation. You can incorporate three or four centers into the same program. It will save people a lot of travel time and get more experts involved because they don’t have to travel.” Carmine J. Ciccarelli, MD; Tolland, Conn.
“If we can do a simple day travel or save some time and money and spend less time away from family and office, it’s a benefit. I’d like to see it even more widespread or broadcast even to home computers. That sort of thing would be the next step.” John M. McNaughton, MD; Knoxville, Tenn.
“Being able to unite the people in California, Philadelphia, and here…and all of us interacting over the Internet…it’s exciting; it’s good technology, and once we sharpen it up, it’s going to be the way of the future.” Adolph V. Lombardi, Jr., MD; New Albany, Ohio

During the 2009 Annual Meeting, The Daily Edition of AAOS Now introduced the “Surgeon on the Street” feature. It was so popular, we decided to incorporate it into the monthly AAOS Now. This month’s question focuses on the learning experience of course directors and attendees during the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons/AAOS “Cutting Edge Developments and Controversies in Total Joint Arthroplasty” course, April 30–May 2, 2009.

The unique course took advantage of satellite technology to bring faculty surgical demonstrations and discussion to three sites simultaneously: Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Rosemont, Ill. Participants were able to share knowledge, case experiences, and questions and answers among all three sites. AAOS Now spoke to surgeons at the Orthopaedic Learning Center in Rosemont.