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AAOS Now

Published 9/1/2013

ORS to Host Basic Science Course

Basic science provides the tools to explain the functions and limitations of the science behind the decisions, treatments, and procedures that are performed in clinical practice every day. Despite the importance of basic science in the treatment of orthopaedic diseases and conditions, however, many university departments do not have the expertise to cover a complete basic science curriculum. To fill this void, the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) is offering an all-day basic science course on Sunday, March 16, 2014, in conjunction with the ORS 2014 Annual Meeting in New Orleans.

“Unfortunately, many university orthopaedic departments do not have the necessary faculty to teach the essentials of musculoskeletal basic science,” explained Theodore Miclau, MD, one of the course’s organizers. “As a result, residents and future researchers are missing out on key elements of their orthopaedic education.”

The course content was derived from the Orthopaedic Basic Science: Foundations of Clinical Practice textbook developed in partnership with the AAOS and ORS. Covered topics will include principles of orthopaedic surgery basic science, musculoskeletal tissue biology, and musculoskeletal pathophysiology. Course attendees will also receive a copy of the textbook as part of the registration fee.

Although the course promises to be of particular interest to residents looking to pass their orthopaedic exams, nearly everyone working in orthopaedics will find the content relevant.

“The course will provide a comprehensive overview of the most important fundamentals of basic science related to musculoskeletal medicine,” Dr. Miclau said. “It will benefit anyone currently in the field or entering the field of orthopaedics, including practicing orthopaedic surgeons and musculoskeletal researchers.”

In the long-run, however, it is the patient who will ultimately benefit from the knowledge gained in the course, according to Dr. Miclau. “Understanding the science behind clinical decisions is important as we strive to improve patient care,” he said.

Registration for both the ORS Basic Science Course and the ORS 2014 Annual Meeting opens on Oct. 9, 2013. For more information, visit www.ors.org