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AAOS Now

Published 8/1/2014
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Alan S. Hilibrand, MD

Introducing the New A Nation in Motion Website

Members, patient, public will find it engaging and interactive

The Academy’s A Nation in Motion® (ANIM) campaign continues to be an extremely effective platform for the orthopaedic community to engage patients, the public, media, and policymakers on issues about bone and joint health, and further illustrate the value we bring to society.

This major public awareness effort began 3 years ago and was designed to highlight the value of orthopaedic care through the patient’s eyes. Essentially, this website centered around patient testimonials in response to the simple phrase, “Because of my orthopaedic care, I can….” When the website launched in 2012, more than 600 patient stories were included.

Over time, more pages, stories, and functionality were added to enhance the orthopaedic narrative. Surgeon Stories, Ortho-pinions, public service campaigns, the Value of Orthopaedics clinical study data, infographics, and background information were posted. The site, although rich and detailed in content, became confusing for users to navigate.

Based on research conducted with patients and AAOS members, a new strategy for redesigning and restructuring content was developed. One common thread was a desire for more targeted information about orthopaedic conditions and the various steps patients might take on their orthopaedic ‘journey’ from diagnosis to recovery.

The new campaign site (anationinmotion.org) continues to build on the success of the previous concept, telling the story of orthopaedics through the words of patients whose lives have been renewed. But the design and content have been enhanced, revised, and streamlined to engage key stakeholders.

The new website experience
A clean homepage (
Fig. 1) and user interface features five main hubs: Condition Center, Bone and Joint Health (Health in Motion), About ANIM, Value of Orthopaedics, and Submit Your Story. Users can navigate through the skeleton by body part, or drill down through specific filters such as age, location, sex, or interests, to find information most pertinent and relevant.

The Condition Center features information tailored to specific body parts. Each condition ‘hub’ includes links to OrthoInfo.org where patients can go for more information on treatment, prevalence statistics, related patient stories, and news articles. Patients can also search for a local orthopaedic surgeon, leave comments throughout the site, or ask questions about an orthopaedic condition.

When patients share a story, they are now asked to provide more detailed information about their orthopaedic experience. They can upload multimedia—including video—and leave tips for other patients. They can even choose to opt-in for updates about bone and joint health advocacy issues.

Bone and Joint Health (Health in Motion) is the main content hub of the site. It consists of actionable health articles primarily directed at patients, but also at others who want to maintain their bone and joint health. Ortho-pinions, past AAOS public service messages, and recent consumer news articles now live here.

Ortho-pinions, your contributions to ANIM, continue to be one of the biggest drivers of new web traffic and have kept the site current and refreshing. The new site tags all related member content into one section. For example, if you submitted an Ortho-pinion, a Surgeon Story, and have patient stories on the website, all that information will be on one screen. Your profile will include a “contributor badge” if you submit at least three Ortho-pinions.

If you have yet to author an Ortho-pinion or pen a Surgeon Story, it’s not too late. These opportunities are also a great way for you to market your practice or institution by including those links within your submission.

Second Firsts
This component of the new ANIM website was unveiled during the 2014 AAOS Annual Meeting. Second Firsts is a concept that captures the powerful voice of a patient when, because of orthopaedic care, he or she is ready to experience something again for the first time. It can be as basic as walking around the block or picking up a child or as monumental as running a marathon after recovering from knee reconstruction.

The power of orthopaedic surgeons to provide patients with a “Second First” and the patient’s journey to success will be highlighted through the video, media outreach, and social media efforts (#SecondFirst and #ANationInMotion).

The new site launched a few weeks ago, and I encourage you to continue sending patients to share their stories and interact with the campaign.

ANIM and You
A Nation in Motion is central to the new AAOS vision: keeping the world in motion through prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. ANIM is a campaign that will evolve, as this new streamlined, more interactive site shows.

Orthopaedic surgeons keep this nation in motion. I hope that you will find ANIM to be of value, continue to share this rich resource with your patients, and engage in this important awareness campaign. Include a link to anationinmotion.org on your practice or institutional website, and promote this new website on your social media channels. Don’t forget to use #SecondFirst or #ANationInMotion

As our specialty continues to be scrutinized on many fronts, ANIM helps to further illustrate just why we went into medicine in the first place.

Thanks to our industry partners—Biomet, Microport, Stryker, and Zimmer—for their continued support for A Nation in Motion this year. This campaign would not be possible without their generous support.

If you have questions about getting involved in ANIM or have comments about the new website, please contact Melissa Leeb, AAOS director of public relations, at 847-384-4030 or at leeb@aaos.org

Alan S. Hilibrand, MD, chairs the AAOS Communications Cabinet. He can be reached at ahilibrand@gmail.com

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