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During the 2015 Annual Meeting, the AAOS Trending exhibit located near Venetian Ballroom G will be the go-to place for media resources to help promote your practice.

AAOS Now

Published 3/1/2015
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Alan S. Hilibrand, MD

Lights, Action, Las Vegas

Experience AAOS Trending featuring AAOS TV and Hometown Radio

The AAOS 2015 Annual Meeting in Las Vegas just got even more exciting with the introduction of AAOS Trending, a special exhibit brought to you by the Academy’s public relations department.

As you enjoy the finest presentations of orthopaedic education, research, and technology at this year’s meeting, be sure to stop by the AAOS Trending exhibit, located on level two in the grand foyer near Venetian Ballroom G. While there, you’ll gain access to free media resources that can help you promote your practice, as well as to public awareness campaigns that enhance the image of orthopaedic surgeons.

Exhibit features
AAOS TV—New for your reception area. Be one of the first to preview AAOS TV, a free member benefit. AAOS TV is a new avenue for patient engagement—providing education and entertainment in your reception area. This patient-focused DVD features content that is both informative and inspirational. The hour-long video includes segments on injury prevention, orthopaedic advocacy calls-to-action, and A Nation in Motion®, the Academy’s public awareness campaign.

To request a copy of the new AAOS TV video, simply drop off your business card at the AAOS Trending exhibit.

iPad Interactive Stations—Maximize your membership with free public relations programs from the AAOS. Explore the many Academy bone and joint health campaigns that help to shape public perceptions about who orthopaedic surgeons are and what we do. Highlights will include the Academy’s A Nation In Motion and Decide to Drive campaigns, social media pages, and the AAOS Media Spokesperson Program.

Hometown Radio—Sign up today to become a local radio personality. From Wednesday, March 25 to Friday, March 27, Hometown Radio health reporter Christopher Michael will conduct short on-site interviews with interested members. After the Annual Meeting, the interviews will be edited and distributed to radio stations in participants’ home towns. Space is limited, so email media@aaos.org as soon as possible to schedule an interview.

The target audience for these interviews is the general public and future patients. Potential topics might include anything from seasonal injury prevention tips to setting the right expectations after hip replacement surgery to sharing advice on distracted driving awareness. Think of Hometown Radio as an opportunity to answer some of the questions patients ask in the office.

The Academy’s patient education website, OrthoInfo.org, also has hundreds of patient-centered articles and other material that might help generate topic ideas.

If you participate in Hometown Radio, please be sure to refer to OrthoInfo.org and ANationinMotion.org as websites where listeners can find more bone and joint health information. You can also suggest that listeners share their success stories of orthopaedic care on the A Nation In Motion website.

AAOS Trending is sure to be one highlight of the Annual Meeting you won’t want to miss!

Alan S. Hilibrand, MD, chairs the AAOS Communications Cabinet.

Tips for a successful radio interview

  • Prepare for your radio interview by creating three to five key messages. The beauty of a radio interview is that you can bring your notes with you.
  • Never answer questions with a “yes” or “no.” Always offer additional details to support or expand your perspective.
  • Use short sentences to make each key point. The reporter will most likely use a 15-second audio sound bite. If you talk for too long without finishing the sentence, your point may never make it on the air.
  • Speak in a natural, conversational tone with different inflections based on the point being made.
  • Use gestures while talking, even though they cannot be seen. This will help with voice inflection and emphasis for important points.
  • If the reporter asks if you want to add anything else, be sure to say something like “Listeners can find more information about this topic at OrthoInfo.org,” or direct them to your personal website.

Source: AAOS Media Relations Program