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2010-2011 LFP graduates celebrated at Annual Meeting

The Leadership Fellows Program (LFP) class of 2010–2011 celebrated their graduation yesterday. To recognize their achievement, mentors presented each graduating member with a copy of Seeing Patients: Unconscious Bias in Health Care, by Augustus A. White III, MD.

Pat on the back...

2010–2011 Leadership Fellows Program (LFP) graduates: Patricia L. McKay, MD; Arabella I. Leet, MD; Julie A. Switzer, MD; Taizoon H. Baxamusa, MD; Laura Phieffer, MD; Matthew T. Provencher, MD; K. William Kumler III, MD; Walter Stanwood, MD; Robert S. Sterling, MD; Nirmal C. Tejwani, MD. Top finishers in the 2011 Annual Meeting 5K race (overall): Michael E. Raemisch, MD, (1st place); Christopher J. Roach, MD, (2nd place); Mike Greiwe, MD, (3rd place). 2011-2012 Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society (RJOS) Board of Directors: Lisa K. Cannada, MD, president; Michele A. James, MD, vice president; Laura M.B. Gehrig, MD, and Ann E. Van Heest, MD, past presidents; Jennifer M. Wolf, MD, secretary; Amy L. Ladd, MD, treasurer; Michelle L. Wolcott, MD, and Lisa Lattanza, MD, members-at-large. Recipient of the 2011 American Association for Hand Surgery (AAHS) and the Hand Surgery Endowment (HSE) Research Grant: Alexander Y. S. Shin, MD. 2011 AAHS officers and board members: Steven McCabe, MD, president; Jesse B. Jupiter, MD, president-elect; Donald H. Lalonde, MD, vice president; Peter M. Murray, MD, treasurer-elect; Miguel A. Pirela-Cruz, MD, historian; Jaiyoung Ryu, MD, parliamentarian; Randipsingh R. Bindra, MD, FRCS, senior director-at-large; Jeffrey B. Friedrich, MD, junior director-at-large; and Sharon Andruskiwec, PT, CHT, junior affiliate director-at-large.

LFP class of 2010-2011

Selected by the Leadership Development Committee, the Leadership Fellows Program (LFP) class of 2010–2011 consists of 10 new LFP Fellows chosen from 55 applicants.

Established in December 2001, the LFP is a 1-year program that identifies future leaders and prepares them to assume roles of responsibility within AAOS. The LFP combines didactic leadership training with an ongoing mentoring program that matches the participants with an established leader within the orthopaedic community. As advisor and confidant to the LFP fellow, the mentor fosters a close professional and personal relationship that continues throughout the fellowship year and beyond.

Participating in the program provides many benefits for fellows, including involvement in educational programs to enhance leadership skills and learning how the AAOS is organized and functions.

Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Manifestations and Management

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a homozygous deletion in the SMN1 gene and is manifested by loss of the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord. Classifications of the disorder are based on age of onset and the patient's level of function. Scoliosis and hip subluxation or dislocation are two musculoskeletal manifestations associated with SMA. Severity of scoliosis correlates with age at presentation. Bracing has been unsuccessful in halting curve progression and may interfere with respiratory effort. Early onset scoliosis associated with SMA has been successfully treated with growing rod constructs, and posterior spinal fusion can be used in older children. Hip subluxations and dislocations are best treated nonsurgically if the patient reports no pain because a high rate of recurrent dislocation has been reported with surgical intervention.

Obesity Linked to More Growth-Plate Fractures in Children

Terry Stanton

Two studies of pediatric patients with fractures found that obese children are more likely to incur fractures that involve the growth plate, or physis, than nonobese children.

In a study examining lower-extremity long-bone fractures in obese and nonobese pediatric trauma patients, Shawn R. Gilbert, MD, and colleagues found that obese patients were more likely to have fractures involving the physis as a result of blunt trauma compared to nonobese patients. A second study on the effect of obesity on both low- and high-intensity pediatric fractures, conducted by Rushyuan J. Lee, MD, and colleagues, also found that obese and overweight children had a greater number of growth- plate injuries than children of normal weight. In light of epidemic obesity among children, the topic has implications for a growing number of surgeons.

Congratulations to our first class of Achievement Award Winners!

Active volunteer involvement is at the heart of AAOS activities. Our meetings, courses, educational materials, clinical practice guidelines, and advocacy efforts are just a few of the many activities that depend on participation by volunteers for their success. Volunteers are vital—not only to the AAOS, but also to orthopaedic specialty societies; national, state, and local orthopaedic societies; and the broader medical community.

The AAOS Board of Directors established the Achievement Award Program to encourage and enhance individual growth of Academy members, and to thank them for their many contributions to education, research, and advocacy in orthopaedics. This new program recognizes participation by AAOS members in Academy programs and elsewhere in orthopaedics.

This program was designed to recognize those who are freely giving back and to create an incentive for others to do the same. For more information on the Achievement Awards Program, visit www.aaos.org/news/whatsnew/achievementawards.asp

Obesity Linked to More Growth-Plate Fractures in Children

Terry Stanton

Two studies of pediatric patients with fractures, which were presented at the 2012 AAOS Annual Meeting, found that obese children are more likely to incur fractures that involve the growth plate, or physis, than nonobese children.

In a study examining lower-extremity long-bone fractures in obese and nonobese pediatric trauma patients, Shawn R. Gilbert, MD, and colleagues found that obese patients were more likely to have fractures involving the physis as a result of blunt trauma compared to nonobese patients. A second study on the effect of obesity on both low- and high-intensity pediatric fractures, conducted by Rushyuan J. Lee, MD, and colleagues, also found that obese and overweight children had a greater number of growth plate injuries than children of normal weight. In light of epidemic obesity among children, the topic has implications for a growing number of surgeons.