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Ankle Arthroscopy: I. Technique and Complications.

Arthroscopic surgery of the ankle allows the direct visualization of all intra-articular structures of the ankle without an arthrotomy or malleolar osteotomy. Technological advances and a thorough understanding of anatomy have resulted in an improved ability to perform diagnostic and operative arthroscopy of the ankle. The decreased morbidity and faster recovery times make it an appealing technique compared with open arthrotomy. A keen understanding of the anatomy of the foot and ankle is critical to safe performance of arthroscopic procedures and prevention of complications.

Ankle Arthroscopy: II. Indications and Results.

Diagnostic indications for the use of ankle arthroscopy include unexplained pain, swelling, stiffness, instability, hemarthrosis, and locking or popping, as well as a negative workup in a patient with significant ankle symptoms unresponsive to conservative care. Therapeutic indications include injuries of the articular cartilage and soft tissue, bone impingement, debridement of soft-tissue lesions, synovectomy and loose-body removal, arthrofibrosis, ankle fractures, and osteochondral defects. Ankle arthroscopy can also be used in ankle-stabilization procedures and arthrodesis, as well as for irrigation and debridement of septic arthritis. An algorithm has been developed to facilitate selection of the appropriate treatment for a patient with chronic ankle pain of unknown etiology. When used for the appropriate indications, ankle arthroscopy appears to give good results.

Study Examines Early Weight Bearing After Microfracture Surgery for Talus Lesions

Overall outcomes the same; functional scores better at 6 weeks 
Patients managed with early weight bearing (EWB) following arthroscopic microfracture for osteochondral lesions of the talus exhibited significant improvement in early postoperative functional scores compared to those managed with delayed weight bearing (DWB), according to research presented by CPT J. Banks Deal Jr, MD, of Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii at the 2016 annual meeting of the Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons (SOMOS). This finding was not associated with any significant differences in functional scores or pain at any other time points.

Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus

An osteochondral lesion of the talus is a defect in the cartilage of the talus resulting from injury to the cartilage surface, underlying bone, or both, and leading to ankle pain and dysfunction. Such lesions are a significant source of ankle pathology that can lead to long-term disability and arthritis. They can affect the young and old alike, and may be related to acute trauma or chronic instability, or may be congenital, but are often related to a combination of these factors. Because of the relatively small surface area of the talus, loss of even a small area of its cartilage is poorly tolerated, and surgery is often required for lesions that do not heal primarily. Surgical options for the treatment of symptomatic lesions have been a subject of controversy. The simplest such option is arthroscopic excision of a loose fragment of cartilage and bone. However, inconsistent results of the simple excision of such fragments have led to a variety of treatments that vary with the type of lesion that exists. These are aimed at the stabilization of cartilage in situ or restoration of the articular surface of the talus when a defect is present. This article reviews the diagnostic and treatment options for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

Meetings and Course Listings

Listed below are upcoming continuing medical education (CME) courses and orthopaedic meetings (July through November 2008). For more information about AAOS-sponsored courses, contact the AAOS customer service department at (800) 626-6726 or visit the CME course section of the AAOS Web site at www.aaos.org/courses

For more information about other CME courses or orthopaedic meetings, contact the source provided.

Meetings and courses sponsored by Board of Specialty Societies members and regional orthopaedic organizations may be listed in the print version of AAOS Now. Other meetings and courses sponsored by nonprofit organizations or orthopaedic state societies may be listed in the online calendar, available at www.aaosnow.org

Meetings and Course Listings

Listed below are upcoming continuing medical education (CME) courses and orthopaedic meetings (May through September 2008). For more information about AAOS-sponsored courses, contact the AAOS customer service department at (800) 626-6726 or visit the CME course section of the AAOS Web site.

For more information about other CME courses or orthopaedic meetings, contact the source provided.

Meetings and courses sponsored by Board of Specialty Societies members and regional orthopaedic organizations may be listed in the print version of AAOS Now. Other meetings and courses sponsored by nonprofit organizations or orthopaedic state societies may be listed in the online calendar, available at www.aaosnow.org

Meetings and Course Listings

Listed below are upcoming continuing medical education (CME) courses and orthopaedic meetings (September through December). For more information about AAOS-sponsored courses, contact the AAOS customer service department at (800) 626-6726.

For more information about other CME courses or orthopaedic meetings listed, contact the source provided.

Meetings and courses sponsored by Board of Specialty Societies members and regional orthopaedic organizations may be listed in the print version of AAOS Now. Orthopaedic state society meetings, invitation-only research symposia, and other meeting listings can be found in the AAOS online calendar, available at www.aaos.org

Meetings and Course Listings

August-October 2012

GENERAL
SEPT. 13–15

Clinical Orthopaedic Society Annual Meeting
The Palmer House, Chicago
Website:
www.cosociety.org

SEPT. 21–22
Musculoskeletal Tumor Society/AAOS Residents Musculoskeletal Oncology Review: Clinical Radiographic and Pathologic Overview and Treatment Principles
Embassy Suites Tampa Downtown Convention Center, Tampa, Fla.
Course directors: Theodore W. Parsons, MD; Robert H. Quinn, MD